THE EDUCATOR

Volume XVIII, ISSUE 2 JANUARY 2006

Achieving Equality in Education:
New Challenges and Strategies For Change

PWTC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

16-21 July 2006

A Publication of

The International Council for Education of
People with Visual Impairment

Click here to skip to the Table of Contents

 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS

PRESIDENT
Lawrence F. Campbell
Overbrook School for the Blind, 6333 Malvern Avenue,
Philadelphia, PA 19151-2597, USA
e-mail : larry@obs.org

VICE PRESIDENT
Steve McCall
University of Birmingham, School of Education, Edgbaston,
Birmingham, UNITED KINGDOM
e-mail : s.mccall@bham.ac.uk

TREASURER
Grace Chan
The Hong Kong Society for the Blind, 248 Nam Cheong Street,
Shamshuipo, Kowloon, Hong Kong
e-mail : ce@hksb.org.hk

SECRETARY
Nandini Rawal
Blind People’s Association, Jagdish Patel Chowk, Surdas Marg, Vastrapur,
Ahmedabad 380 015, INDIA
e-mail : bpaiceviad1@sancharnet.in

PAST PRESIDENT
William G. Brohier
37 Jesselton Crescent, 10450 Penang, MALAYSIA
e-mail : brohier@pc.jaring.my

SECRETARY GENERAL
Mani, M.N.G.
IHRDC Campus, Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya, Coimbatore 641 020, INDIA
e-mail : sgicevi@vsnl.net


REGIONAL CHAIRPERSONS

AFRICA
Wilfred Maina
African Braille Centre, P.O. Box 27715, 00506, Nairobi, KENYA
e-mail : maina@nbnet.co.ke / abckenya@nbnet.co.ke

EAST ASIA
Mavis Campos
Cataract Foundation Philippines Inc., Door #4 Clejal Bldg,
B.S. Aquino Drive, 6100
BACOLOD CITY, PHILIPPINES
e-mail : mcampos@pldtdsl.net

EUROPE
Hans Welling
Visio
Amersfoortsestraatweg 180
1272 RR Huizen
THE NETHERLANDS
HansWelling@Visio.nu

LATIN AMERICA
Lucia Piccione
Urquiza 2659 - 5001 Cordoba, ARGENTINA
e-mail : lpiccione@arnet.com.ar

NORTH AMERICA/CARIBBEAN
Susan Spungin
American Foundation for the Blind, Education & International Programs, 11 Penn Plaza,
Suite 300, New York, NY 10001, USA
e-mail : spungin@afb.net

PACIFIC
Jill Keeffe
Centre for Eye Research, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology
Locked Bag 8, East Melbourne , 8002, AUSTRALIA
e-mail : jillek@unimelb.edu.au

WEST ASIA
Bhushan Punani
Executive Director, Blind People’s Association, Jagdish Patel Chowk, Surdas Marg, Vastrapur
Ahmedabad 380 015, INDIA
e-mail : blinabad1@sancharnet.in


FOUNDING ORGANISATIONS

American Foundation for the Blind
Susan Spungin
American Foundation for the Blind,
11 Penn Plaza, Suite 300
New York, NY 10001, USA
e-mail : spungin@afb.net

Perkins School for the Blind
Steven M. Rothstein
175 North Beacon Street, Watertown,
MA 02472, USA
e-mail : president@perkins.org

Royal National Institute of the Blind
Colin Low
105 Judd Street, London WC1H 9NE UNITED KINGDOM.
e-mail : colin.low@rnib.org.uk

 

INTERNATIONAL NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

Deafblind International
Michael Collins
Hilton/Perkins Program, Perkins School for the Blind
175 N. Beacon Street Watertown, MA 02172 USA
e-mail : collinsm@perkins.pvt.k12.ma.us

World Blind Union
William ROWLAND
President
c/o South African National Council for the Blind
P.O. Box 11149, Hatfield - 0028 Pretoria
SOUTH AFRICA
e-mail : rowland@sancb.org.za

International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness
Richard Porter
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT
UNITED KINGDOM
rporter@v2020.org

 

NON-GOVERNMENTAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS

Christoffel-Blindenmission
Allen Foster
Nibelungenstrasse 124, 64625 Bensheim, GERMANY
e-mail : overseas@cbm-i.org

Sight Savers International
Peter Ackland
Grosvenor Hall, Bolnore Road, Haywards Heath,
West Sussex RH16 4BX
e-mail : packland@sightsavers.org

Organización Nacional de Ciegos Españoles Luz Laine Mouliaá
Luz Laine Mouliaá
C/ Prado No 24, 28014 Madrid, SPAIN
e-mail : llm@once.es

Asian Foundation for the Prevention of Blindness
Clive Oxley
c/o Hong Kong Society for the Blind, 248 Nam Cheong Street, Shamshuipo, Kowloon, HONG KONG
e-mail : genadmin@hksb.org.hk

Editor
Steve McCall
University of Birmingham
School of Education
Edgbaston, Birmingham
UNITED KINGDOM
s.mccall@bham.ac.uk

Editorial Committee
Steve McCall
Susan Spungin
Larry Campbell
M.N.G. Mani

Publications Committee
Steve McCall
Susan Spungin
William G. Brohier
Jill Keeffe
Peter Rodney-Jensen
Tula Baxter
M.N.G. Mani

Typesetting and Printing
ICEVI Secretariat
IHRDC Campus
Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya
Coimbatore - 641 020
Tamil Nadu
INDIA
Phone : 91-422-2697530
Fax : 91-422-2692353
e-mail : sgicevi@vsnl.net

CONTENTS

  1. Message from the President
  2. Message from the Editor
  3. Suggested structural changes in the Principal Officers group and other Constitutional changes to better meet current and future needs of ICEVI
  4. Delegates to the General Assembly
  5. Marga Schulze Foundation for the Promotion of Blind Girls and Women in Africa and Asia
  6. Nominations Committee and Procedures for Nominating Principal Officers
  7. 12th World Conference - General Details
  8. Welcome to Malaysia
  9. Registration Form
  10. Draft Programme of the 12th World Conference
  11. What can you expect from the Parallel Sessions for the World Conference?
  12. What can you expect from the Focus Day workshops of the World Conference?
  13. Scholarship details for the World Conference
  14. Inviting Nominations for ICEVI Awards
  15. Education For All children with visual impairment : Global Campaign - Pontevedra Communique
  16. The International Non Government Organisations (INGO) Global Campaign
  17. IMPACT OF Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation Grant in Creating Educational Access for Blind Children in the Developing World- Draft Planning Document
  18. Tech Talk
  19. News from the Regions
  20. Publications of ICEVI
  21. New China Journal on Education of Children with Visual Impairment

 


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT


January 19, 2006

Dear Colleagues:

Happy New Year! Xin Nian Kuai Le! As I look at my calendar I am reminded that we are midway between the Western and the Chinese New Year. We are also approaching the end this quadrennium….and what a quadrennium it has been!

We began this journey in the Netherlands in the Year of the Horse and we will end it in the beautiful city of Kuala Lumpur in the Year of the Dog. In between, there has been the Ram, the Monkey and the Rooster. Now I am not sure what I should read into that; but for me it has been a very gratifying four years. While, we still have a long journey to reach our goal of bringing educational equity to all children with visual impairment, I believe we have made some significant progress during this quadrennium.

Recently, a group of international organizations gathered in Pontevedra, Spain to develop the framework for a global campaign and program of action that over the next decade is committed to providing children with visual impairment the same access to education that their sighted peers enjoy. This promises to be a truly collaborative global initiative that will bring ICEVI into a working partnership with those who share the same vision: our colleagues within the World Blind Union, our growing roster of international partners, our colleagues at UNICEF, UNESCO and WHO and most importantly you, our members on the front lines in all of those countries where education for children with visual impairment is still only an elusive dream for the majority of children with a visual impairment.

We are including in this issue of The Educator the draft concept paper for this campaign and action program. The Interim Task Force that was created at Pontevedra would welcome your comments and suggestions that can be sent to the Interim Task Force via the ICEVI Secretariat. In the meantime, William Rowland, President of WBU, Ana Palaez, President of International Relations, ONCE and I are working hard to get UNICEF and UNESCO actively involved in this program. By the time we gather in Kuala Lumpur I hope there will be much more to report and, of course, we will keep you updated via future issues of The Educator, ICEVI Newsline and regular updates on our website www.icevi.org.

I hope you will take the time to read an article that Colin Low and I have prepared which describes some suggested changes that the Executive Committee feel should be made in our Articles of Association for the more effective functioning of ICEVI. Delegates to the General Assembly will discuss and vote on these changes on July 21, 2006. We know that this is not exactly exciting reading, but we hope you will give thought to these suggested changes and express your views through your regional committee.

Just six months from today we will be midway through our 12th World Conference. I hope that many of you join us in Kuala Lumpur where a Host Committee, chaired by the Malaysia Association for the Blind, is preparing a “truly Asian” welcome and the Program Committee under the leadership of Heather Mason is putting together an exciting professional program. You will find lots more information about the 12th World Conference on the pages that follow.

I look forward to seeing with many of you in Kuala Lumpur and I wish each of you a happy, healthy and productive year ahead whether that be 2006 or 4703.


Sincerely,

Larry Campbell
President

MESSAGE FROM THE EDITOR

Happy New Year to all our readers! Unlike our time traveller Larry, who slips effortlessly between different time zones and even different calendar systems, I am still coming to terms with the shock that it is actually 2006 – where did this quadrennium go? This is the seventh edition I have been Editor for and each one marks for me a milestone along the quadrennium path. I have to count back through the editions to make sure it’s true that it is four years since our last world conference. We have had editions (in no particular order) on Early Intervention, Inclusion, Professional Development, MDVI, Technology and Sport. As Larry says, this edition of the Educator is largely dedicated to the forthcoming ICEVI World Conference and recent key developments in ICEVIs mission to extend educational opportunities to children through the world.

The Report on the ICEVI research in Uganda is now available and we hope that our brief overview in this edition will sufficiently whet your appetite to consider viewing it on the ICEVI website or even purchasing a hard copy, especially if you are involved in developing education provision for children and young people with visual impairment. It marks a beginning rather than an end to ICEVIs involvement in research. As we can see from the article on the EFAVI initiative, international organisations in the field are united in their determination to make equal education for all children with visual impairment a reality, and an evidence base that is focussed on the realities of children and their environments will be a major asset in planning for this great cause.

Putting together the Educator brings me into contact with contributors of articles from far and wide but I rarely get the chance to meet them in person. So in November, I was delighted to be able to meet up with Gabriel Mayr de Oliveira Silva who co-wrote the article on soccer in the last edition of The Educator produced in association with IBSA. Gabriel, who is currently on work experience in the UK, came to visit me in my office and we talked about football and his passion to see persons with visual impairment involved in sport at all levels. I look forward to meeting many more past and future contributors in Kuala Lumpur at what promises to be another excellent conference. I warn you in advance that although my hair is now much greyer than it was at last conference in Holland - my shirts are still very colourful!

As ever my thanks to Mani and his staff for their tireless efforts in producing this edition.


Best wishes


Steve McCall

SUGGESTED STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE PRINCIPAL OFFICERS GROUP AND OTHER CONSTITIONAL CHANGES TO BETTER MEET CURRENT AND FUTURE NEEDS OF ICEVI

Larry Campbell, President ICEVI
and
Colin Low, Member of the ICEVI Executive Committee


This article has been prepared to provide ICEVI members with an overview of, and the reasoning behind some suggested amendments to the ICEVI constitution, known as the Memorandum and Articles of Association, that if adopted at our General Assembly in Kuala Lumpur will provide for a modest restructuring of the Principal Officers group and a few other modest changes to the existing constitution that better reflect the current needs and realities of our organization. Article 11.3 of the Articles of Association requires that any amendment shall be published in the Council’s journal and on the Council’s website not later than three months prior to the General Assembly at which they are to be discussed.

Since 2002 ICEVI has had, for the first time, a permanent office and a full-time Secretary General. In reviewing our current and future operational structure the Principal Officers felt that this had brought about the need for some changes in the structure of the Principal Officers group along with a few other changes that would allow for better functioning. These changes require the endorsement of the delegates to the General Assembly that will be convened immediately following the 12th World Conference in July 2006.

While this information is of particular importance to the delegates to the General Assembly we urge all persons active in ICEVI to take the time to read these suggested changes and to share your views on them with ICEVI through your regional committee.

Over the past few years ICEVI has seen many changes and a rapid increase in both the scope and intensity of our work throughout the world.

One of the most significant changes in the way our organization functions on a day-to-day basis has been the appointment of a full-time Secretary General and a small secretariat staff.

The creation of the post of Secretary General also has had implications for the roles and functions of the Principal Officers, particularly those of the Secretary and the Immediate Past President. The role of Immediate Past President was created largely to provide the organization with an institutional memory”, a function that our permanent office now provides. As one might expect, many of the duties traditionally associated with the post of Secretary have been assumed by the Secretary General and his staff.

With this as background, the Executive Committee meeting in Madrid, Spain in 2005, discussed a concept paper on restructuring of the Principal Officer group. The Executive Committee after full discussion felt that the post of Secretary should be eliminated and that of a Second Vice-President added. However, the Executive Committee felt that the role of Immediate Past President should be retained. These suggestions mean that if the recommendations of the Executive Committee are endorsed by delegates through amendments to Article 4.1 (a) of the Articles of Association, the Principal Officers group will consist of:

1. President
2. Immediate Past President
3. First Vice-President
4. Second Vice-President
5. Treasurer

The Committee feels that having a First and Second Vice-President, each with responsibility for a specific portfolio of activities, makes sense. The Executive Committee also feels that having two Vice-Presidents provides ICEVI members and the Executive Committee with an opportunity to evaluate possible future Presidential candidates.

These suggested structural changes in the Principal Officers group do require a change in the Articles of Association that must be voted on at the General Assembly to be held on July 21 2006 after the World Conference in Kuala Lumpur from 16 to 21 July this year. With this in mind, the Executive Committee has asked the Nominations Committee to be prepared to present two slates of officers for consideration by the General Assembly. The first slate would be based upon the assumption that the suggested structural changes are approved. The second would be presented should those changes not be approved and the current structure be maintained.

In addition to the above structural changes, the following amendments, which are largely of a clarifying nature, are proposed:

- in Article 4.6, provision is made for appointing someone else in the place of a member of the Nominations Committee who wishes to stand for one of the Principal Officer positions;

- a new Article 5.5 clarifies the position of the Secretary General at meetings of the Principal Officers and Executive Committee;

- Article 7.4 makes clear that the tenure of Regional Chairpersons and international members of the Executive Committee should normally be limited to two full terms, and

- Article 7.5 makes clear that the tenure of Principal Officers is limited to two full terms.

Below the reader will find the current Memorandum and Articles of Association with the suggested amendments highlighted in bold all capital. These must be passed by a two-thirds majority if they are to be adopted.


COMPANY No. 4521195
The COMPANIES ACTS 1985 and 1989

COMPANY LIMITED BY GUARANTEE AND NOT HAVING A SHARE CAPITAL

MEMORANDUM OF ASSOCIATION OFINTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION OF PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

1. The name of the company (hereinafter called “the Council”) is the International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment.

2. The registered office of the Council will be situated in England and Wales.

3. The objects for which the Council is established are:-
3.1 To be a global association of individuals and organisations that promotes equal access to appropriate education for all visually impaired children and youth so that they may achieve their full potential.
3.2 To establish and maintain regions and support their activities;
3.3 To convene a General Assembly at the end of each term;
3.4 To promote cooperation with local, national, regional and global governmental and non-governmental organisations active in or related to the education of people with visual impairment;
3.5 To influence governmental and United Nations agencies with respect to the education of people with visual impairment;
3.6 To promote a positive image of people with visual impairment;
3.7 To promote involvement of persons with visual impairment and their families in educational policy and planning.

4. In order to facilitate the exchange of expertise and professional knowledge and skills, the Council shall have power to:
4.1 Promote local, regional and global networks;
4.2 Promote training courses, conferences and meetings at a local and regional level;
4.3 Promote local, national, regional and global communication;
4.4 Publish a global journal and regional newsletters through the internet and otherwise;
4.5 Promote local and regional special interest groups and their inter-regional linkages;
4.6 Do all such lawful things as may assist in carrying into effect the objects of the Council.

5. Benefits to Members and Directors
5.1 In this clause “director” means a member of the executive committee as provided for in the Articles of Association.
5.2 The property and funds of the Council must be used only for promoting the objects and do not belong to members and there shall be no distribution of any profit whether by declaration of dividend or otherwise.
5.3 Notwithstanding the previous subclause members including directors may be paid interest at a reasonable rate on money lent to the Council and may be reimbursed in respect of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses (including hotel and travel costs) actually incurred in running the Council.
5.4 Subject as aforesaid a director must not receive any payment of money or other material benefit (whether directly or indirectly) from the Council :
Provided a director may receive a benefit where the Council makes a payment to a company in which he or she has a less than five percent shareholding.

6. The liability of the members is limited.

7. Every member of the Council undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Council, in the event of the same being wound up while he/she is a member or within one year after he/she ceases to be a member, for payment of the debts and liabilities of the Council contracted before he/she ceases to be a member and of the costs charges and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributories amongst themselves such amount as may be required not exceeding £1.

8. If upon the winding up or dissolution of the Council there remains, after the satisfaction of all its debts and liabilities, any property whatsoever the same shall not be paid to or distributed among the members of the Council but shall be given or transferred to some other body having objects similar to the objects of the Council and which shall prohibit the distribution of its income or property among its members to an extent at least as great as is imposed on the Council, under or by virtue of clause 5 hereof, such body to be determined by the members of the Council at or before the time of dissolution, and in so far as effect cannot be given to the foregoing provision, then to some other charitable body.
We the persons whose names and addresses are subscribed are desirous of being formed into a company in pursuance of this Memorandum of Association.

COMPANY No. 4521195
The COMPANIES ACTS 1985 and 1989

COMPANY LIMITED BY GUARANTEE AND NOT HAVING A SHARE CAPITAL

ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION

OF

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION OF PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT


1. Membership:
1.1 Membership of the Council is open to any individual or organisation subscribing to the objects of the Council as laid down in the Memorandum of Association.
1.2 Members shall pay an annual subscription as shall be determined from time to time by the Executive Committee. Subscriptions shall reflect the diversity of the financial resources available to different organisations and in the different regions of the Council.

2. Regional Structure:
2.1 The basic structure of the Council is a regional one and the members of the Council are primarily members of a region. The Executive Committee shall determine the number of regions into which the Council is divided and the countries making up each region.
2.2 The Regional Members shall elect for each term from the region a Regional Chairperson and one or more Regional Deputy Chairpersons. The length of a term shall be as prescribed in the Bye-laws.
2.3 The Regional Chairpersons shall be responsible for establishing a Regional Committee of not less than 5 members. Representation on the Regional Committee shall reflect the diversity of the region. The immediate past Chairperson and any Principal Officer belonging to the region shall be a ex officio member of the Committee.
2.4 The Regional Committee shall be responsible for the planning and implementation of regional activities and conducting the business of the region in consultation with the Principal Officers of the Council.
2.5 The Regional Committee shall have power to levy a regional subscription with the agreement of the Executive Committee.
2.6 The audited regional accounts shall be sent to the Council’s Treasurer within three months of the end of each financial year.
2.7 The Regional Chairpersons, together with the five Principal Officers, are the Officers of the Council.
2.8 The Regional Chairpersons shall report regularly to the President on an agreed schedule.
2.9 If a Regional Chairperson is unable to fulfil his/her duties, one of the Deputy Chairpersons shall take over by agreement among themselves. If neither the Chairperson nor any of the Deputy Chairpersons is able to fulfil these duties, the Regional Committee in association with the President shall take decisions about the continuation of the region’s work.
2.10 The Regional Committees shall appoint delegates with voting rights to the General Assembly using a process which respects diversities within the region. The number of delegates per region shall be laid down in the Bye-laws.

3. General Assembly:
3.1 A meeting of the General Assembly shall be held at the end of each term.
3.2 Those entitled to vote at the General Assembly shall consist of the Executive Committee, not more than two Deputy Chairpersons from each region and the other delegates with voting rights appointed by the Regional Committees in accordance with Bye-law 4.
3.3 At a General Assembly, there shall take place a business meeting at which the Regional Chairpersons and Principal Officers shall present a report on their activities during the past term and their plans for the next term. The business meeting shall elect the Principal Officers of the Council, who shall be the President, the Vice-Presidents and the Treasurer. The Immediate Past President is also a Principal Officer.
3.4 The General Assembly may also include a professional conference, which non-delegates may attend.
3.5 At a business meeting of the general assembly, a quorum shall be one third of the members entitled to be present and to vote.

4. Executive Committee:
4.1 The business of the Council between General Assemblies shall be conducted by an Executive Committee, which shall consist of:
a) the Principal Officers of the Council, namely
• the President;
• the Immediate Past President (or other person appointed by the Executive Committee if the Immediate Past President is unable or unwilling to serve);
• THE FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
• THE SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
;
• the Treasurer;
b) the seven Regional Chairpersons representing Africa, East Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America/Caribbean,Pacific and the West Asia.
c) one representative of each of the Founding Members of the Council as follows:
• American Foundation for the Blind
• Perkins School for the Blind
• Royal National Institute of the Blind;
d) one representative of any international non-governmental organisation which supports the objects and plans of the Council and makes a significant financial contribution to its work, the level of such contribution to be determined by the Executive Committee from time to time as part of the dues structure of the Council.
e) one representative of each of the following:
• International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness
• Deafblind International
• World Blind Union.
The Executive Committee may also invite to any of its meetings the Chairperson of any Standing Committee or Working Group established by the Executive Committee.
4.2 The Executive Committee may either ad hoc or for the full term appoint additional members with special tasks who may be invited to participate in meetings of the Executive Committee, but shall have no voting rights.
4.3 The Executive Committee shall evaluate regional developments in terms of the Council’s policy, the global targets set for the term and regional plans.
4.4 The Executive Committee shall keep under review the Memorandum and Articles of Association and the Bye-laws of the Council.
4.5 The Executive Committee shall appoint the members of the Programme, the Nominations, the Finance, the Publications and any other global Standing Committees of the Council.
4.6 A Regional Chairperson who shall be appointed by the Executive Committee shall act as Chairperson of the Nominations Committee. WHEN A MEMBER OF THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE WANTS HIS/HER NAME TO BE CONSIDERED FOR ONE OF THE PRINCIPAL OFFICER POSITIONS, HE/SHE SHALL SEND A LETTER OF RESIGNATION TO THE CHAIRPERSON OF THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE, WHO IN TURN WILL CONSULT THE PRESIDENT AND HAVE A SUBSTITUTE APPOINTED IN THE PLACE OF THE MEMBER WHO RESIGNED FROM THE COMMITTEE.
4.7 The President is ex officio member of the Programme Committee.
4.8 The Treasurer is ex officio Chairperson of the Finance Committee.
4.9 The Vice-President is ex officio a member of the Publications Committee.
4.10 The Executive Committee shall have power to appoint paid staff in order to further the work of the Council.
4.11 At a meeting of the executive committee, a quorum shall be one third of the members entitled to be present and to vote.

5. Principal Officers:
5.1 The Principal Officers are the executive officers of the Council who shall act on behalf of the Council and on behalf of the Executive Committee. They shall report on their activities to the Executive Committee and the General Assembly, and shall meet as necessary. Three shall be a quorum.
5.2. Each of the Principal Officers, in addition to the duties of their post, shall have specific duties as agreed amongst themselves from time to time.
5.3. Each Principal Officer is authorised to act on behalf of the Council on condition that the action is based on the Memorandum and Articles of Association or Bye-laws of the Council; its policy, custom and practice; or a decision of the Executive Committee or of the Principal Officers.
5.4 IF THE PRESIDENT IS UNABLE TO DISCHARGE HIS/HER RESPONSI-BILITIES, THE FIRST VICE PRESIDENT SHALL TAKE OVER RESPONSIBILITY FROM THE PRESIDENT. IF FOR ANY REASON HE/SHE IS OR BECOMES UNABLE TO DO THIS, THE SECOND VICE PRESIDENT SHALL TAKE OVER.
5.5 THE SECRETARY GENERAL WILL NORMALLY BE IN ATTENDANCE AT MEETINGS OF THE PRINCIPAL OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE UNLESS ASKED TO WITHDRAW WHILE MATTERS RELATING TO HIS/HER POSITION AS SECRETARY GENERAL ARE DISCUSSED.

6. International Consultative Committee:
6.1 The International Consultative Committee is an advisory body to the Executive Committee. It is intended to promote global co-operation and linkages between global organisations active in the education of people with visual impairment.
6.2 The Executive Committee shall draw up a list of organisations that will be invited to serve on the International Consultative Committee. These organisations shall meet the conditions laid down in the Bye-laws.
6.3 The Executive Committee shall meet at least once each term with the International Consultative Committee. These meetings shall discuss the Council’s general policy with a view to promoting co-operation and linkages with the invited organisations.

7. Terms of Office:
7.1 All office holders shall take up their positions at the end of the General Assembly at which they were elected. Elections or appointments taking place between General Assemblies shall have immediate effect.
7.2 All office holders shall remain in post until the end of the next General Assembly after their election or appointment.
7.3 Ad hoc appointments shall come to an end when the task for which they were made has been completed, but in any event not later than the end of the next General Assembly after they were made.
7.4 REGIONAL CHAIRPERSONS AND INTERNATIONAL MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SHOULD NORMALLY SERVE FOR NO MORE THAN TWO FULL TERMS.
7.5 NO PRINCIPAL OFFICER SHALL SERVE IN THE SAME POSITION FOR MORE THAN TWO FULL TERMS, NOT INCLUDING ANY UNEXPIRED PORTION OF A PREDECESSOR’S TERM.

8. Postal Ballots:
Postal ballots may be used for deciding any question which requires decision within any organ of the Council. Ballot papers, clearly stating the proposal to be voted on, shall be sent to all persons entitled to vote on the matter in question. All means of written communication may be used.

9. Finance:
The Council’s financial year runs from 1st January to 31st December. The accounts of the Council shall be subject to annual audit by a qualified auditor and the Principal Officers shall appoint an external auditor for the purpose. The audited accounts shall be presented to the Executive Committee who shall have responsibility for approving the financial report. The Executive Committee shall also approve the annual budget of the Council.


10. Use of the Council’s name:
The use of the name of the Council for any purpose, including fund raising, income generation or the production or sale of publications, irrespective of whether initiated and/or executed by members of the Council, is only permitted if authorised in writing by the Principal Officers.

11. Amendment of Articles of Association and Bye-laws:
11.1 These Articles of Association may be amended by the General Assembly.
11.2 Proposals for amendment of the Articles of Association shall be recommended to the General Assembly by the Executive Committee.
11.3 Proposals for amendment of the Articles of Association shall be published in the Council’s journal and on the Council’s website not later than three months prior to the General Assembly at which they are to be discussed.
11.4 Amendment of the Articles of Association shall require a two-thirds majority of the votes either of the members present and voting at a General Assembly or voting in a postal ballot, provided in each case that not less than 50% of those entitled must have voted in order for the proposal to be carried. In the event that less than 50% of those entitled shall have voted, a second ballot on the same proposal may be organised not earlier than two weeks and not later than six months after the first ballot. In this event, not less than 25% of those entitled to vote either at a General Assembly or in a postal ballot must have voted in order for the proposal to be carried.
11.5 The Executive Committee may change or add to the Council’s Bye-laws by a simple majority on a recommendation of the Principal Officers made not later than three months before a meeting of the Executive Committee or a postal ballot on the same. The quorum for votes on such recommendations shall be two-thirds. If there is no quorum, a second ballot may be organised not earlier than two weeks and not later than six months after the first ballot. For the second ballot on the same proposal, the quorum shall be 50%.
11.6 The text of any changes to the Articles of Association or any additions or changes to the Bye-laws, together with the result of any vote, shall be published in the next issue of the Council’s journal following their agreement and on the Council’s website.

12. Dissolution of the Council
On the winding up and dissolution of the company the provisions of the Memorandum of Association shall have effect as if repeated in these Articles.

13. Miscellaneous:
In cases for which there is no clear provision either in these Articles of Association or in law, the Executive Committee shall decide issues according to the spirit of the Memorandum and Articles of Association.

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR EDUCATION OF PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

BYE-LAWS

1. Term of the Association:
The term of the Association between General Assemblies shall be four years.

2. Regional Structure:
2.1 The Association shall be organised into seven regions as follows: Africa, East Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America/Caribbean, Pacific and the West Asia.
2.2 The Africa region shall comprise the following countries: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
2.3 The East Asia region shall comprise the following countries: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, China Taipei, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, East Timor, Hong Kong China, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Macao China, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam.
2.4 The Europe region shall comprise the following countries: Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Macedonia (former Yugoslav Republic of), Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and Yugoslavia.
2.5 The Latin America region shall comprise the following countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela.
2.6 The North America and Caribbean region shall comprise the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, and United States of America.
2.7 The Pacific region shall comprise the following countries: Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua and New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Tuvalu.
2.8 The West Asia region shall comprise the following countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Iraq, Islamic Republic of Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Maldives, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Republic, Uzbekistan, and Yemen

3. International Consultative Committee:
The following organisations having a contribution to make to international work in the field of education of people with visual impairment shall be invited to sit on the International Consultative Committee and shall each be entitled to send one representative:
a) The following international non-governmental organisations:
• Asian Foundation for Blindness Prevention;
• Christoffel Blindenmission;
• Deafblind International;
• Foundation Dark and Light Blind Care;
• Helen Keller Worldwide;
• International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness;
• Norwegian Association of the Blind and Partially Sighted;
• Organizacion Nacional de Ciegos de Espana;
• Sight Savers International;
• Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired;
• World Blind Union.
b) The following United Nations specialised agencies:
• International Labour Organisation (ILO);
• United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO);
• United Nations International Children’s Education Fund (UNICEF);
• World Health Organisation (WHO).

4. Delegates to the General Assembly:
Delegates with voting rights to the ICEVI General Assembly shall consist of:
- all members of the Executive Committee, and 2 Deputy Chairpersons and 10 additional delegates selected by each regional committee -
February 2004

There you have the suggested changes in our Articles of Association and we hope that you will share your views on these suggested changes with your regional committee before the ICEVI General Assembly on July 21, 2006.

DELEGATES TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY


At its meeting in February 2004 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the Executive Committee of ICEVI approved the official number of voting delegates to the General Assembly (formerly referred to as Business Meeting). This was reported on in the January, 2005 issue of The Educator, but we felt as the 12th World Conference and General Assembly are fast approaching it was worth repeating that information here. In addition to the members of the Executive Committee each region will select 12 voting delegates. This means that there will be 106 voting delegates at the General Assembly, as follows:

All members of the Executive Committee - 22
Two deputy regional chairs from each of the 7 ICEVI regions - 14
10 additional delegates from each region - 70
TOTAL - 106

Each Regional Committee has been asked to develop a process for selecting their delegates and in doing to take into account the diversity of the region. Where possible, Regional Committees are asked to submit their official list of delegates to the ICEVI Secretary General prior to the General Assembly. However, recognizing that for some regions this may prove difficult, the Executive Committee has agreed to accept official lists of regional delegates submitted to the ICEVI Secretariat before 12 Noon on Tuesday, July 18. This allows, where necessary, for delegate selection at the first Regional Meeting of the conference scheduled for Monday, July 17 from 4.00pm to 5.30 pm. At the March 2006 Executive Committee meeting, the Secretary General will provide each Regional Chair with an official form on which the regions delegates will have to be listed. Forms for proxy voting will be provided at the same time to each Regional Chair to account for delegates who at last moment are not able to attend the General Assembly.

The official list of delegates eligible to vote at the General Assembly will be posted at the conference centre on the morning of Wednesday, July 19, 2006.


Marga Schulze Foundation for the Promotion of Blind Girls and Women in Africa and Asia

At the ICEVI quadrennial conference in Kuala Lumpur in July, the Marga Schulze Foundation for the Promotion of Blind Girls and Women in Africa and Asia will be presenting the first Marga Schulze Award. The award, which includes a grant of 5,000.00 Euros, is given to a personality who has made an extraordinary contribution to the promotion of blind girls and/or blind women nationally or internationally. The Christoffel Blindenmission and the award’s founders (Dr. Hans-Eugen Schulze, a former blind judge at the federal Court of Appeals in Germany, and his wife Marga) invite nominations for the award before the 28th of February 2006.


NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE AND PROCEDURES FOR NOMINATING PRINCIPAL OFFICERS

The Executive Committee of ICEVI in its meeting in Madrid, Spain 6-7 March 2005, appointed Lucia Piccione, Regional Chairperson of the Latin America Region as chair of the 2006 Nominations Committee. The Executive Committee also agreed on a general composition of the Nominations Committee as follows:

• 3 regional chairpersons providing representation from both developed and developing countries
• One person representing the Founding Members (American Foundation for the Blind, Royal National Institute of the Blind, and the Perkins School for the Blind)
• One person representing the International Partner Organisations (Asian Foundation for the Prevention of Blindness, CBM International, ONCE, and Sight Savers International)

The members of the Executive Committee representing each of the above groups chose their representative(s) and the following is the Nominations Committee approved by the Executive Committee.
• Lucia Piccione (Regional Chair – Latin America) .. Chairperson
• Jill Keeffe (Regional Chair – Pacific region) .. Member
• Eberhard Fuchs (Regional Chair – Europe) .. Member
• Mavis Campos (Regional Chair – East Asia) .. Member
• Susan Spungin (Representative: Founding Members) .. Member
• Peter Ackland (Representative: International Partners) .. Member

Since the Nominations Committee was appointed the following changes have been made:
1. Hans Welling (ICEVI EuropeChairperson) has replaced Eberhard Fuchs
2. Jill Keeffe (ICEVI Pacific Chairperson) has resigned as her name has been put forth for one of the positions of principal officers. She has been replaced by Wilfred Maina, (ICEVI Africa, Chairperson).

Because of the constitutional changes that will be voted on at the General Assembly the Nominations Committee has been directed to prepare 2 slates of officers:
1. Assuming the structural changes are adopted, the slate will consist of President, 1st Vice President , 2nd Vice President and Treasurer.
2. An alternative slate should the proposed constitutional changes related to the Principal Officers group be rejected. That slate should reflect the current constitution and consist of President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer.
The Executive Committee asked the Nominations Committee to consider the following in seeking suitable candidates for Principal Officers’ positions.
• Persons that have adequate organisational support to carry out their duties, as ICEVI is not in a position to provide secretarial and other human resource support the Principal Officers.
• Where possible, preparedness of the organisation the candidate represents to meet the financial expenses connected with travel to attend ICEVI meetings and related functions. (However, this should not preclude the candidacy of an otherwise qualified individual.)
• Availability of time to carry out the work associated with the position. Based upon the growth of ICEVI the Executive Committee anticipates that the workload of Principal Officers is likely to increase in the years ahead and therefore this criteria needs to be looked at quite carefully by the Nominations Committee. As each Principal Officer is responsible for certain portfolios such as international networking, research, publications, etc., lack of time could jeopardise ICEVI programs.
• Effective team players with strong background and experience in education, international development and/or in visual impairment / MDVI / Multi-sensory impairment.

Individuals wishing to submit a nomination to the Nominations Committee are required to:
1. Provide evidence, in writing, that they have the consent of the person they are nominating to make the nomination.
2. Provide a letter nominating a candidate that must be sent to the Chairperson of the Nominations Committee on or before March 6, 2006.

Lucia Piccione, Chair, Nominations Committee
Urquiza 2659, 5001 Cordoba, ARGENTINA
lpiccione@arnet.com.ar

The Nominations Committee will present then present a slate of officers for consideration and endorsement by the Executive Committee and that slate will be presented to the General Assembly, However, this does not prevent nominations from the floor by any official delegate provided that the person making the nomination has the written approval of the person being nominated and nomination is seconded by another delegate.

12th WORLD CONFERENCE –
GENERAL DETAILS AND REGISTRATION FORMS

Topic:
Achieving Equality in Education: New Challenges and Strategies for Change


GENERAL INFORMATION
The 12th World Conference of ICEVI will be conducted at Putra World Trade Centre, Kuala Lumpur from 16 to 21 July 2006. The Malaysian Association for the Blind (MAB) is the host organization of the conference. The MAB is managing the Registration and Accommodation arrangements whereas the ICEVI Secretariat is adminstering the submission of Abstracts.

Here are the details regarding Registration and Accommodation:

Registration Fee
The Registration Fee for the Conference is as follows:
• Registration before 15 March 2006 - US $ 450/ MYR 1710 (Non-Malaysian), MYR 500 (Malaysian)
• Registration after 15 March 2006 - US $ 500/ MYR 1900 (Non-Malaysian), MYR 550 (Malaysian)
• Accompanying person - US $ 150/ MYR 570 (Non-Malaysian), MYR 350 (Malaysian)

The registration fee is inclusive of conference kit, map of venue, copy of Abstracts (in normal print, large print, English Braille or CD), principal conference papers, lunches, refreshment during opening reception, conference dinners and half-day official tour.
Accompanying persons will not be provided with the proceedings and conference kit or bag, but will be able to join the conference, lunches and the social functions including the half-day official tour.

Registration Fee may be paid to MAB Conference Account No 0061-10-002875-0 (Name of the account ‘Malaysian Association for the Blind – ICEVI 2006, Name of Bank ‘EON Bank Bhd’, Address of Bank: Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Swift code: EOBBMYKL) through electronic transfer or bank draft or through credit card. Please see Section K: Method of Payment of the Registration Form for more details.

Hotels
The following hotels are suggested for accommodation (rates are for one room, if twin sharing please indicate):

1. Pan Pacific Hotel - US $ 66/MYR 251 per night (5 star rating)
2. Legend Hotel - US$ 61/MYR 232 per night (5 star rating)
3. Grand Seasons Hotel - US$ 49/MYR 186 per night (4 star rating)
4. Dynasty Hotel - US $ 45/MYR 171 per night (4 star rating)
5. Grand Pacific Hotel - US $ 24/MYR 91 per night (2 star rating)


Conference Languages
The official language of the conference will be English. During the main sessions and some of the parallel sessions, simultaneous translation will be available in Japanese, Chinese and Spanish.

Post Conference Workshops
Immediately following the 12th World Conference, ICEVI plans to organise three training workshops for a limited number of applicants who have attended the World Conference. The training workshop topics are:

Workshop A : Visually Impaired Children with Additional Disabilities
Workshop B : Low Vision
Workshop C : Early Childhood Intervention

Assuming that there is sufficient interest in these workshops they will be organised at three separate venues in Kuala Lumpur on July 22 and 23, 2006. Please note that in making selections the Training Workshop Coordinators will give preference to applicants who are:

1. actively working in a program that includes or is developing a component related to the workshop topic,
2. willing and able to share the skill and knowledge acquired with others and
3. from a developing or emerging market country with limited training opportunities.

If you are interested in being considered as a participant in one of these training workshops, please send an e-mail including your preferred choice of workshop to ICEVI Secretariat in India (sgicevi@vsnl.net)

Tours
Tours may also be arranged to the following places on request. For cost and other details, please refer to Sections G and H of the Registration Form.

1. Putrajaya
• Wetlands
• Lake
• Mosque
• Administrative Capital
2. KL Tower, KLCC & Twin towers
3. City tour/Parks – Birds, Butterfly, Museum

Exhibition Booths
The fee for organizations wishing to put up exhibition booths is US $ 1000 and for International Vendors it will be US $ 1500

Official Airline
Malaysian Airlines is the official airline of the conference.

For further details, contact:

GEORGE THOMAS
Executive Director
MALAYSIAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND
Kompleks MAB, Jalan Tebing, Off Jalan Tun Sambanthan 4, 50470 Brickfields,
Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA
Tel : + 603 22722677; + 603 22722680
Fax : + 603 22722676
E-mail : mablind@po.jaring.my or icevi2006@mab.org.my
Websites : www.icevi.org & www.mab.org.my

Welcome to Malaysia

Malaysia has a population of over 25 million people who reside in the Peninsula and the states of Sabah and Sarawak on the Borneo Island. The country prides itself on the harmonious existence of various races as a nation. While the majority are Malays; Chinese, Indians, Ibans, Kadazandusuns, and other ethnic groups make up a colorful and vibrant society. Malaysia’s official language is Bahasa Malaysia, but English is widely spoken. The official religion of Malaysia is Islam, and the nation comprises Moslems, Christians, Buddhists, Hindus and followers of other religions. The various ethnic pups, cultures and languages make Malaysia, Truly Asia.

WEATHER CONDITIONS
Hot and humid all year round, Malaysia enjoys an equatorial climate of temperatures ranging from 22 to 32 degrees Celsius in the lowlands. However, it is cooler in highland areas. The annual rainfall here averages 200-250 cm. Dressing in clothing of breathable and light material is advised. Comfortable and warm garments need be worn only at hill resorts.

MONEY MATTERS
Money exchange facilities are available in all major towns. The Malaysian Ringgit (RM) comes in denominations of RM1, RM5, M10, RM50 and RM100, and coins from one sen (cents), 5 sen, 10 sen, 20 sen, 50 sen and RM1. All major credit cards are accepted in most establishments.

All commercial banks are authorized foreign exchange dealers and open from 9.30am to 4pm on weekdays, and 9.30am to 12 noon on Saturdays. They are closed on Sundays, the first and third Saturdays of the month, and public holidays. However, the banks in Kelantan and Terengganu close on Fridays. They are open from 9.30am to noon from Saturdays to Thursdays, except on the first and third Thursdays of the month. Other licensed moneychangers operate in key entry / exit points and shopping malls. Most hotels exchange foreign currency and accept travellers’ cheques.

MOVING ABOUT
Most international airlines serve Kuala Lumpur and also Penang, Langkawi, Kota Kinabalu and Kuching. Malaysia Airlines provide connections to all domestic destinations within the country. Peninsular Malaysia has road and rail links to Singapore and Thailand. Many car rental companies have counters at airports, some shopping complexes in the city and major towns in the country. Local transport is efficient and cheap, and this includes air-conditioned express buses and long distance taxi services. Driving on the left side of the road is observed throughout the country.

COMMUNICATIONS
Telephone, facsimile, telegraph, telex, postal and e-mail facilities are available for local and international communications. Cyber cafes with Internet services can be easily found in urban centers.

TIME DIFFERENCE
The standard Malaysian time is eight hours ahead of GMT.

NATIONAL ECONOMY
In the last decades of the 20th century, the Malaysian economy saw rapid changes.
Still a leading exporter of rubber, palm oil, timber, tin, petroleum and natural gas, Malaysia’s manufacturing industry has overtaken its agricultural industry with the growth in the economy sector since 1987. The nation is fast moving from the industrial into the information age.

The year 2020 is targeted for the nation to achieve “developed-nation” status. Top exports include electronic, chemical, wood and metal products, textiles, apparel and transport equipment. Malaysia is a leading producer of semiconductors, audio-visual products, air-conditioners, rubber-dipped products and oleo chemicals. The economic trend is moving towards providing value-added products.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
A valid passport (and visa if applicable) is required for all persons entering Malaysia.

A passport is also necessary for travel between Peninsular Malaysia and the East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak, as well as between Sabah and Sarawak.

IMMIGRATION
All visitors are required to complete an Arrival / Departure Card, a Customs Declaration, and, if required, a Travellers Declaration Form (TDF) and Quarantine Form. These are given out on all inbound Malaysia Airlines’ flights.

Travellers are no longer required to complete the TDF with the exception of the following circumstances: Resident travellers who carry ringgit in excess of RM1,000. Resident travellers who take out foreign currency notes and / or travellers’ cheques exceeding the equivalent of RM10,000. The above also applies to the current practice of obtaining prior written approval from Bank Negara Malaysia which remains unchanged. Additionally requirement for written approval includes if: Non-resident travellers take out foreign currency notes and travellers’ cheques in excess of the taken out is more than the equivalent of US$2,500.

The TDF form should be handed to the immigration officer together with the disembarkation card and passport. No visa is needed for nationals of Commonwealth countries except for Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Nigeria. Nationals from Switzerland, Netherlands, San Marino and Liechtenstein do not require visas. No visa is required for a stay not exceeding three months for nationals of Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kirgystan, Kuwait, Kyrgyz Republic, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Morocco, North Yemen, Norway, Oman, Peru, Poland, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, U.A.E., Uruguay and Yemen.

No visa is required for U.S.A. citizens visiting Malaysia for social, business or academic purposes (except for local employment). No visa is required for a stay of less than one month for nationals of all ASEAN countries, except Myanmar. For a stay exceeding one month, a visa will be required, except for nationals of Brunei and Singapore. No visa is required for a stay not exceeding one month for nationals of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Astonia, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hong Kong SAR, Ivory Coast, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Latvia, Lithuania, Macau SAR, Macedonia, Maldova, Mexico, Moldivia, Monaco, Mongolia, Nicaragua, North Korea, Panama, Paraguay, Portugal, Russia, Sudan, Surinam, Tadjikistan, Timur Leste, Togo, Ukraine, Upper Volta, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Zaire and other countries.

No visa is required for a stay not exceeding 14 days for nationals of Iran (15 days), Iraq, Libya, Syria, Macau (travel permit), Portugal Alien Passport, Palestine, Sierra Leone, Somali, Somalia and South Yemen.

Nationals of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo Republic, Congo Democratic Republic, Cote D’Ivoire, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Western Sahara, Taiwan, Myanmar, Nepal, Bhutan, Colombia, People’s Republic of China, all holders of Certificate of Identity (CI), Laisser Passer and Titre De Voyage, and Afghanistan (visa with reference) must obtain a visa before entering Malaysia. (Please contact the Host Committee for visa requirements for specific countries).

VISIT PASSES
A Social Visit Pass does not permit the holder to take up employment, business or professional work in Malaysia. The Social Visit Pass allows foreign visitors to enter Malaysia for business negotiations or inspection of businesses. However, these passes cannot be used for employment purposes or for supervising the installation of new machinery or the construction of a factory. No fee is charged for a Social Visit Pass issued for a period of up to three months. A nominal fee is imposed for each month beyond this. However, a nominal fee is imposed for a stay exceeding three months.

For further information, please contact the Immigration Department: Jabatan Imigresen Malaysia (Kementerian Hal Ehwal Dalam Negeri) Tingkat 1-7 (Podium) Blok 2G4, Precinct 2 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62550 Putrajaya Wilayah Persekutuan. Contact no: +603-8880 1555 / 8880 15/56 E-mail: visapass@imi.gov.my

HEALTH REGULATIONS
Cholera vaccination is NOT required for travellers entering Malaysia. Visitors arriving from Yellow Fever Endemic Zones and other affected areas are required to present International Health Certificates showing Yellow Fever vaccination. This regulation, however, does not apply to children below the age of one.

CUSTOMS
At Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA), there are 26 Customs lanes located beyond the Baggage Reclaim area.

PROHIBITED GOODS
The trafficking of Dangerous Drugs in Malaysia is a serious offence that carries mandatory death sentence.

BAGGAGE
There are 12 baggage conveyors at KLIA. Those marked ‘L’ and M’ are for domestic arrivals only, while the rest are dedicated to international arrivals. Passengers may find complimentary trolleys available close to the Baggage Reclaim area for convenience. On the airside, hand luggage trolleys are available near the arrival gates. The 24-hour Left Baggage service is available at two Arrival Levels, which are strategically located at Level 3 and 5. Welcome to Malaysia’s international airport and the home of Malaysia Airlines. Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) is one of the most advanced airports in the Asia-Pacific region. As a spectacular feat of architecture, KLIA combines futuristic technology, elements of Malaysian culture and the rich, tropical splendour of its natural resources. Located within the Multimedia Super Corridor and close to the country’s administrative capital, Putrajaya, the airport is approximately 75 kilometers south of Kuala Lumpur’s city centre. It is accessible via the Kuala Lumpur-Seremban Highway / KLIA Interchange, and the Shah Alam / North-South Central Link Expressway. Drive time to the city centre is approximately 60 minutes.

ARRIVALS
Most international flights arrive at the Satellite Building. The Aero train then brings passengers to the International Level of the Contact Pier. Other international and mixed flights arrive at the Domestic Level of the Contact Pier but passengers are directed one floor up into the International Level. Domestic flights arrive at the Domestic Level and passengers disembark there.

DEPARTURES
All international flights depart from the Contact Pier and Satellite Building. All domestic flights depart from the Contact Pier only.

FOOD AND BEVERAGE
The airport houses various food and beverage outlets situated on the Departure and Arrival Levels of the Main Terminal Building, and within the Satellite Building.

TRANSPORTATION
The KLIA Express (ERL) station to the city is at Level 1 (Ground Floor) of KLIA Main Terminal Building. Ticket counter and vending machines for the purchase of ERL tickets are located at the Arrival Hall. Airport Limousine and Budget Taxi services use a coupon system. Taxi counters are located at the exit from the Arrival Hall. Public bus services are also available one floor down from the Arrival Hall. Private vehicle car parks are connected by the skybridge on the Mezzanine Level.

SHOPPING, FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Duty-free specialty shops are located on the Departure and Arrival Levels of the Main Terminal Building, and within the Satellite Building. There are convenient foreign exchange and telecommunications facilities.

CHECK-IN AT KLCAT
KL City Air Terminal (KLCAT) is the extension of KL International Airport in the city. KLCAT now offers check-in facility to passengers with standardized baggage for both international and domestic flights ex-KLIA. Open daily from 0400 hours to 0100 hours, please allow at least two hours to complete the check-in process before flight departure at KLIA.

 

TENTATIVE PROGRAMME OF THE 12TH WORLD CONFERENCE

(Please log onto ICEVI's website www.icevi.org to know the latest programme of the World Conference)

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM THE PARALLEL SESSIONS OF THE WORLD CONFERENCE?

The Program Committee received more than 425 abstracts. The committee along with the regional chairpersons of ICEVI regions have selected 352 abstracts till date and the format of presentation by the speakers will be as follows:

1 DVD/CD Rom / Video Presentation - 11
2 Interactive workshops - 23
3 Lecture - 229
4 Poster sessions - 89
TOTAL - 352

The classification of the abstracts as per the three major themes of the conference is as follows:

1 Attitudes / Policies - 93
2 Human Resources Development - 69
3 Strategies for Change - 190
TOTAL - 352

The papers of the conference will be presented under the following topics

1 Access and Information Technologies and Adaptive or Assistive Technology
2 Access to curricular and extra-curricular areas
3 Access to literacy through Braille or print
4 Alternative education models for young adults
5 Assessment procedures – theory and practice
6 Creating educational equity for women and girls
7 Early childhood intervention
8 Equality of access to education
9 Inclusive educational practices
10 Innovative use of community resources
11 Life skills including orientation and mobility, social skills
12 Life-long learning
13 Low vision
14 Multi-Disabilities and Visual Impairment (MDVI)
15 New/Innovative service models
16 Personnel preparation – Teacher education / other professionals
17 Professional (multi-disciplinary) collaboration
18 Rebuilding educational systems in countries affected by War or National Disasters
19 Working with families

Therefore, the parallel sessions are packed with hundreds of quality papers from speakers drawn from different parts of the world.

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM THE FOCUS DAY WORKSHOPS OF THE WORLD CONFERENCE?

During the conference, Focus-Day workshops will be conducted by resource persons in the respective areas. The title, brief description of the workshop and the resource persons are listed below:

1. Title of Workshop - VISION 2020 and Education for All: 2015
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues: Gullapalli N Rao, Jill Keeffe, Larry Campbell, M.N.G. Mani
3. Target Audience - Educators, Education leaders and administrators, Rehabilitation & Low Vision Professionals, Program Managers
4. Maximum number of participants - 40 – 50
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge :No specific skills are needed but the participants will have a specific interest in program development at national, regional or global levels
6. Overall Aims: - To discuss how the global strategies relating to human resource development, resources and infrastructure developed for Vision 2020 can provide learning for the development of global, regional and national strategies for Education for All 2015, To explore collaborations between IAPB and ICEVI
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: - Presentations by course leaders, - Interactive discussion , - Regional working groups, - Presentation of outcomes of group discussions
8. Anticipated outcomes: - Better understanding of the role of Vision 2020: The Right to Sight and how collaboration can enhance progress in the achievement of Education for all by 2015, - Establishment of processes for collaboration between IAPB and ICEVI at regional and national levels, - Formulation of recommendations from group discussions to assist in implementation of Education for All 2015


1. Title of Workshop - Advocacy, Self-Help, and Policy Formulation
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues:
Dr. Aubrey Webson, Christopher Friend, Paul Ennals
3. Target Audience - Leaders, educators and parents
4. Maximum number of participants - 25
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge : none
6. Overall Aims:
To help people to respond to the changing environment regarding disabled children’s and youths’ right to education.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: 1) Mini-presentation, 2) Groups / workshops, 3) Facilitated discussion aimed towards outcomes
8. Anticipated outcomes:
Participants will gain tools for advocacy and information via presentation and shared discussion around disability policy initiatives.

1. Title of Workshop - Parents Mobilising Parents for Advocacy
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues: Susan LaVenture, Paul Manning
3. Target Audience - Parents of children who are visually impaired or blind, including those with multiple disabilities, Service providers who work with families.
4. Maximum number of participants - unlimited
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - Parents willing to learn how to advocate for their child, Parents willing to learn how to establish a parents association in their local region, state/province or country, Professionals willing to support the development and outreach of a parent movement.

6. Overall Aims: To teach parents how to find and access resources for their children. To teach strategies for the development and organization of parent associations, To give examples and strategies for parents and parent’s associations to advocate and effect policy for improvements of educational and rehabilitation services for children, Strengthen Parent Advocacy globally
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: Power Point Presentation with overview, Presentations by experienced parent leaders from different regions of the world, Small group work, feedback , Information collated and feedback at workshop in hard copy form,

8. Anticipated outcomes: Parents will learn advocacy skills, Parents will learn strategies to form parent networks and associations, Increased parent advocacy and parent movement globally, Follow-up programme subject to funding, Closer ties with ICEVI, WBU, and the United Nations


1. Title of Workshop- Working with Families and Carers
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - Mrs Tula A Baxter

3. Target Audience - Parents, carers, educators and professionals in the VI field
4. Maximum number of participants - 40
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - Being a parent of a VI child or having knowledge or experience in caring for a VI child; professionals or educators working with VI children or intending to work with them
6. Overall Aims: 1. Finding ways of meeting many of the needs of VI children and parents and avoiding fears, 2. Exploring ways of building trust and looking for win-win solutions , 3. Discussing successful mediation in situations of conflict
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: A mixture of short presentations from parents/professionals from several regions, followed by discussion to share good models and best practice and then some practical exercises to help participants use the above to develop their approaches to information sharing, decision making and conflict resolution
8. Anticipated outcomes: Participants will: 1. gain knowledge of new models for meeting the needs of the VI child and his/her family, 2. be empowered to revisit their present frameworks of support and improve them, 3. learn how to concentrate on what they want to happen by having informal but structured meetings to discuss assessments, resources and setting goals - and how to avoid the blame culture in times of conflict

1. Title of Workshop - MDVI Services – Assessing Community Needs and Developing Plans
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues Main Coordinator: Mrs. Nandini Rawal, Other Colleagues: Ms. Alana Zambone, Ms. Sumitra Mishra and Mrs. Rutchneekorn
3. Target Audience - • Professionals and families interested in understanding and assessing communities for initiating programmes for MDVI Children, • Persons interested in learning about community resources and utilising them to the utmost for the rehabilitation of the MDVI children, • People already working with MDVI children who are interested in learning about innovative and sustainable approaches.
4. Maximum number of participants - 50-60 people
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge : • Knowledge of working with MDVI children • Enthusiasm and interest in learning about newer rehabilitation approaches , • Participants who come from developing countries or interested in community approaches
6. Overall Aims:
• To ignite minds to think about innovative projects for MDVI children , • To help participants in better understanding community resources and their effective utilisation
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: • Coordinator’s Lead , • Two concept papers , • Panel discussion, • Group Activity , • Summing Up
7a. Additions suggested : Display of Photographs of innovations
8. Anticipated outcomes - • Increase in the number of community based programmes for children with MDVI : • Innovations in the CBR approach , • Needs assessment in the community by participants on their return home after the conference, • Belief in the viability of community based strategies for reaching out to MDVI children , • Development Of Network of CBR Interveners , Families and Adults


1. Title of Workshop MDVI Services – Innovative Community Based Strategies
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues Main Coordinator: Mrs. Nandini Rawal, Other Colleagues: Ms. Charlotte Cushman, Mrs. Vimal Thawani and Ms. Mila Gros Wayno
3. Target Audience- • Professionals and families interested in understanding and assessing communities for initiating programmes for MDVI Children
• Persons interested in learning about community resources and utilising them to the utmost for the rehabilitation of the MDVI children, • People already working with MDVI children who are interested in learning about innovative and sustainable approaches.
4. Maximum number of participants - 50-60
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge : • Knowledge of working with MDVI children, Enthusiasm and interest in learning about newer rehabilitation approaches , Participants who come from developing countries or interested in community approaches

6. Overall Aims: • To ignite minds to think about innovative projects for MDVI children , • To help participants in better understanding community resources and their effective utilisation
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: • Coordinator’s Lead , • Two concept papers , • Panel discussion, • Group Activity , • Summing Up
7a. Additions suggested- Display of Photographs of innovations
8. Anticipated outcomes- • Increase in the number of community based programmes for children with MDVI , • Innovations in the CBR approach , • Needs assessment in the community by participants on their return home after the conference, • Belief in the viability of community based strategies for reaching out to MDVI children , • Development Of Network of CBR Interveners , Families and Adults


1. Title of Workshop Achieving Equality in Education: Facilitating & Using Community Resources
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - A.H.M. Noman Khan

3. Target Audience - NGOs, Government agencies, Educational institutes, People with Visually Impairment who are involved in planning and implementing education programs for visually impaired learners.
4. Maximum number of participants - 40
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge : • Education of Visually Impaired learners, • Community Based programs for education and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons.
6. Overall Aims: • Explaining and utilising community resources for achieving equality in education for the visually impaired.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop
Format of the workshop: • Introduction to the topics;, • Presentation of papers by nominated presenters, followed by question & answers (3 – 4) presentations); • Large Group discussion to identify recommendation for further intervention on the issue; • Conclusion.
8. Anticipated outcomes:
• Participants and presenters will come to a consensus and understanding of the significance of community resources in education of the visually impaired persons;, • Need based recommendations will be identified for implementation to expedite the education of visually impaired people at all levels.

1. Title of Workshop - Important times for Observation and Assessment in Early Intervention
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues : Hyvärinen, Lea MD

3. Target Audience -Special teachers, local optometrists and ophthalmologists, workers of Associations of and for the Blind and Visually Impaired,
Paediatricians, paediatric neurologists
4. Maximum number of participants - 20, preferably they should choose the workshop and send their names a month before the conference to receive the materials
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - Work in early intervention in infancy
6. Overall Aims: Improve the working skills in early intervention of all visually impaired infants, especially infants with motor delays, intellectual disabilities and hearing loss.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: Short introductions to each part of the discussion by the chairperson, plenum discussion on different approaches in different countries.
8. Anticipated outcomes:
A pre-conference position paper will be developed to a booklet on assessment techniques. It will be targeted to new services but will useful also in Western countries. This position paper will include also discussion on early assessment for intervention and special education.


1. Title of Workshop Low Vision: Access to Resources
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues : Jill Keeffe, Ms Chueng Yuet Mei, Ms Phoebe Lam,
Mr Yap Wing Foo, and Mr Hasan Minto
3. Target Audience - Educators, therapists or rehabilitation workers working with students of any age with low vision
4. Maximum number of participants - 50
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - Work with students with low vision
6. Overall Aims: • Give participants an understanding of the clinical and functional assessment of children with low vision, • Introduce the range of low cost low vision devices from the Low Vision Resource Centre, • Provide “hands-on” experience in the use of low vision devices
7. Activities/Format of the workshop - Lectures, demonstrations and a practical session with low vision devices
8. Anticipated outcomes-
• Knowledge of the clinical and functional assessment of low vision , • Understanding of the uses of low vision devices


1. Title of Workshop Preparing Specialist Teachers to Work in the Real World through E-Learning: Exploring the Role of Problem Based Learning (PBL)
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - Dr Mike McLinden, Dr Steve McCall

3. Target Audience - Educators with an interest in professional development within Higher Education
4. Maximum number of participants - 40
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - An interest in the design and production of online professional development resources within Higher Education. Knowledge of how PBL is used for professional development is not essential. The workshop will be held in English and will include a visual demonstration of online resources.
6. Overall Aims- • To provide an introduction to PBL;, • To explore how PBL can be used as an innovative teaching and learning approach in the professional development of educators who support students with visual impairment;• To demonstrate relevant online teaching and learning resources and discuss their role in professional development within Higher Education.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: The format will be a practical activity based workshop divided into two parts. Part 1 will provide an introduction to problem based learning, and will explore how it can be used as an innovative teaching and learning approach within Higher Education. Part 2 will demonstrate how PBL has been used within the virtual learning environment and will include a visual demonstration of online teaching and learning resources that have been developed by the coordinators.

8. Anticipated outcomes- Increased knowledge of the potential of PBL as an innovative teaching and learning approach within Higher Education, An appreciation of key factors to consider when developing PBL resources for use in a virtual learning environment


1. Title of Workshop Methods of Teaching Information and Communication Technologies
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - Karolina Caran and Victor Tsaran
3. Target Audience- Educators, computer instructors, trainers of assistive technologies
4. Maximum number of participants - Up to 30
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - Familiarity with assistive technologies and computers in general
6. Overall Aims: The aim is to demonstrate that it is possible to make learning computers skills for people with visual impairments (or anybody else, for that matter) easy, fun and interactive.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: Demonstration of the teaching techniques through real-life examples; interaction with the audience; hands-on demonstrations and (if time permits) discussion of the presented material.
8. Anticipated outcomes:
To show that it is possible to teach technology in a variety of non-traditional ways; to encourage educators to seek for alternative ways of teaching their students; to demonstrate that the classroom should become a playground for ideas.

1. Title of Workshop - Promoting Braille Literacy
Braille, despite developments in technology, is still the basic communication system of the blind person throughout the world. It is the right of children who are blind to learn to read and write braille. The workshop will offer information and seek contributions from participants, regarding the standard and innovative approaches to teaching braille to young children who are blind and to those who require braille later in their schooling.
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - Reinette Popplestone, Gillian Gale

3. Target Audience - Parents, teachers, teacher assistants, therapists and people involved with braille-using children of all ages.
4. Maximum number of participants - 50 people

5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - A basic knowledge of braille
6. Overall Aims: • To improve insight into what it means to be braille literate, • To provide skills to people involved with pre-literate and literate braille-using children to promote braille and help children who are blind to attain full literacy, • To increase the opportunities of producing a braille-using community who read because they want to and not because they must
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: Short presentations and practical sessions on: • early braille for children under 6, • helpful hints for tactile illustrations, • braille for school beginners, • braille for older beginners, • braille for children with additional disabilities, • braille for those supporting a braille-using child
8. Anticipated outcomes:
• an understanding of the importance and methods of delivery of braille for very young children, • an understanding of the use of basic tactile graphics and concrete objects to enhance early literacy, • a knowledge of the issues of teaching and using contracted versus uncontracted braille, • a knowledge of programs , • a knowledge of available programs to assist sighted people to learn braille


1. Title of Workshop Teaching Mathematics to Children with Visual Impairment
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues : Dr. M.N.G. Mani, Aree Plernchaivanich, S.N. Goswamis Shashanka J. Dutta and G.R. Ramesh
3. Target Audience - Teacher Educators, Teachers of Visually Impaired Childre, Visually Impaired Individuals and Staff pf Braille Book production Centres.
4. Maximum number of participants - 40 to 50
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge - None in particular
6. Overall Aims: 1. To create awareness that teaching mathematics to children with visual impairment is not difficult., 2. To provide an overview of the ICEVI/ON-NET mathematical package and demonstrate some methodologies of teaching mathematics to children with visual impairment, 3. To determinate the use of WIMATS (Webel Mediatronics & ICEVI MAthematics Transcription Software)
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: 1. Introduction, 2. Demonstration of some techniques to teach mathematics, 3. Practice by the participants, 4. Questions and answers, 5. Hands on experience in using the software
8. Anticipated outcomes: 1. The workshop will motivate teachers and teacher educators to learn more about teaching mathematics to children with visual impairment, 2. The workshop will also give a feedback on the type of capacity building programmes ICEVI should organise in the future to promote mathematics education., 3. The workshop will enable teachers and staff of Braille Book production centres to acquire knowledge to transcribe Mathematics book into Braille format.


1. Title of Workshop- “Assessment and Decision Making Regarding Appropriate Literacy media”
2. Names/titles of main co-ordinators + other colleagues - Cay Holbrook

3. Target Audience - Teachers of students with visual impairments, administrators, university faculty in visual impairment
4. Maximum number of participants - 100 (I am flexible and could do this in a small or large group)
5. Pre requisite skills or knowledge : Basic knowledge of braille and reading instruction would be a benefit for participants
6. Overall Aims: The primary aim of this presentation would be to address and discuss the factors, which go into assessment and decision making regarding appropriate literacy media. In addition, issues relating to the provision of quality specialized services will be examined.
7. Activities/Format of the workshop: This workshop will allow participants to view videotapes of student case studies and discuss the decisions to be made regarding literacy media based on information presented. In addition, video tape from the SLATE (Supporting Literacy Achievement and Teacher Effectiveness) project which includes examples of experienced teachers engaged in literacy instruction will be shown.
8. Anticipated outcomes

Participants will gain understanding about:
• Factors related to the decision to begin teaching young children braille, print or both;
• Factors to consider during on-going assessment of literacy achievement as it relates to literacy media decisions;
• Factors related to literacy instruction for students with multiple disabilities in addition to visual impairment;
• Characteristics of quality instructional programs leading to literacy achievement.

and MUCH MORE to learn from the conference.

Subscription to The Educator

A special counter will be put up at the World Conference in order to facilitate participants to pay their subscription for The Educator. The subscription rate for the entire quadrennium is US$50 and those who subscribe during the conference will be given a 10% discount and also some surprise gifts. Be a subscribing member for The Educator and update yourselves with the multifarious activities of ICEVI.

SCHOLARSHIP DETAILS FOR THE WORLD CONFERENCE

The ICEVI Scholarship Committee, chaired by Grace Chan, JP, Treasurer has generated a fund of US $ 150,000 to support participants from various regions to attend the 12th World conference. Based on the population, average per capita income in the region, and average air fare to Kuala Lumpur, the funds have been allocated to the regions as follows:

Africa : US $ 30000
East Asia : US $ 22500
Europe : US $ 16500
Latin America : US $ 25500
North America and the Caribbean region : US $ 13500
Pacific : US $ 12000
West Asia region : US $ 30000

The following guidelines may be helpful to participants seeking sponsorship from their region to attend the world conference.

1. Applicants should approach their Regional Chairperson for sponsorship. Please do not approach Principal Officers or the ICEVI Secretariat. The complete addresses of the regional chairpersons along with their e-mail IDs are given on the inside front cover.

2. The Regional Committees will give preference to applicants whose abstracts have been accepted by the Program Committee. The program committee will be sending a list of those chosen to present at the World Conference directly to the Regional chairpersons.

3. The Program Committee will also send an “Acceptance of Abstract” letter to presenters for inclusion with sponsorship requests to the Regional Chairperson.

4. Each ICEVI region will draw up appropriate guidance for its applicants. Although there will be some variation in administration of sponsorship grants, in almost all cases applicants will be expected to raise a portion of the cost themselves. This will allow the Scholarship committee to use its funds to reach the maximum numbers of persons in need.

INVITING NOMINATIONS FOR ICEVI AWARDS

ICEVI was started in 1952 by a team of dedicated persons connected with the education of persons with visual impairment. In order to recognise individuals who have made significant contributions to the growth of ICEVI, awards are presented at the World conference. A committee is constituted for this purpose and it invites nominations for these awards from throughout the world.

Herman Gresnigt, former Regional Chairperson of ICEVI Europe and a recipient of ICEVI’s International Excellence Award in 2002 has been appointed by the Executive Committee to Chair the 2006 Awards committee. Bill Brohier (East Asia), Gladys Nyaga (Africa) and Susan Spungin (North America/Caribbean) are the other members of the Awards Committee.

The Awards Committee has been charged with selecting a maximum of four nominees to be the quadrennial recipients of its International Excellence Award. The award will be presented at the 12th World Conference in Kuala Lumpur in July, 2006.

Each ICEVI Region is invited to submit to the Awards Committee the nominees who meet the following criteria:

1. have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of education of blind and low vision persons that has had impact beyond their own school or organization and

2. have made a significant and long lasting contribution to ICEVI.

Nominations should be prepared in an abstract that does not to exceed two single space typewritten pages. This document should explain how the person meets these criteria and why they would be a worthy recipient.

Nomination papers must be forwarded by fax or e-mail to the ICEVI Secretariat (sgicevi@vsnl.net) with a copy to Dr. Gresnigt <herman.gresnigt@wxs.nl> not later than February 20, 2006. The Secretariat will consolidate the list for the Award Committee shortly after the nominations deadline.

Education For All children with visual impairment : Global Campaign - Pontevedra Communique

Recognizing that less than 10% of children with visual impairment in the developing world currently have access to education and building upon discussions within International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI) regarding the need to develop a global campaign and programme, a group of leading international non-governmental development organisations met in Pontevedra, Spain on November 27-29, 2005.

The group committed to the development of a global campaign and programme with the aim of providing early intervention and appropriate education for children with visual impairment with the working title of “Education For All Children with Visual Impairment (EFAVI).”

This campaign and programme are being designed to reach the millions of children with visual impairment who currently lack education. The campaign will include the following major elements:

• Awareness building
• Advocacy
• Programme development and implementation
• Human resource development, and
• Fund raising

The organisations meeting in Pontevedra reviewed and approved a planning document outlining the elements of the campaign to be led by ICEVI acting in partnership with the World Blind Union (WBU). UNESCO and UNICEF will be invited to participate in this campaign.

The Interim Task Force chaired by Larry Campbell, President, ICEVI comprises representatives of Christoffel Blindenmission/Christian Blind Mission (CBM), Hilton-Perkins Programme (HPP), International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI), Norwegian Association of the Blind and Partially Sighted (NABPS), Overbrook International Program (OIP), Sight Savers International (SSI), Spanish National Organisation of the Blind (ONCE), and World Blind Union (WBU). The Interim Task Force reports to the executive committee of ICEVI.

The Interim Task Force agreed upon priority activities for the first five years of the campaign with the following activities needing to be completed before July 2006.

• Developing a logo and title for the campaign
• Establishing linkages for the purpose of networking and advocacy with UNESCO, UNICEF and others
• Establishing a formal relation between ICEVI/WBU and UNESCO & UNICEF
• Securing formal WBU commitment and involvement for a partnership role in the campaign and the programme.
• Preparing leaflets, brochures and other mass media materials for the campaign.
• Forming a global task force for implementation of the business plan for the campaign and programme.
• Developing a website.

ENDORSED and UNDERWRITTEN by the organizations who participated in the meeting.

The group expressed appreciation to Organizacion Nacional de Ciegos de Espana (ONCE), who generously hosted this meeting.


Pontevedra, Spain
November 29, 2005

The International Non Government Organisations (INGO) Global Campaign

DRAFT PLANNING DOCUMENT


WHY THE EFA CAMPAIGN?
The Dakar Declaration states that education for all children will be achieved by the year 2015. “Education For All” (EFA) must include children with a disability ¬— education is the fundamental right of every human being. As organizations of and for the blind striving to provide educational and rehabilitation services to persons with visual impairment around the world, particularly in developing countries, we are overwhelmed with the challenge that is facing us. These are the realities:

• According to WHO statistics, 161 million persons live with a disabling visual impairment, of whom 37 million are blind and 124 are persons with low vision.
• About 90% of them live in developing countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific Regions.
• Nearly 6 million of them are preschool and school age children, 90-95% of whom have no access to education.
• The girl child with visual impairment receives less attention and is often doubly discriminated against on grounds of both gender and disability.
• Most visually impaired children with additional disabilities receive no educational services.

Governments all over the world have signed the Dakar Declaration agreeing to develop access to education for all children including children with visual impairment. However, the present reality in many developing countries is that education of children with disabilities is still a low priority and this needs to change. Though educational provision for children with visual impairment has existed for more than 100 years in many countries in the developing world, typically less than 10% of these children receive any education. The main reasons for this seem to be:

• Negative or patronizing attitudes toward blind persons and their abilities
• Failure to sensitize the community and mainstream education infrastructure to the needs of children with impaired vision and their potential for inclusion.
• Failure to mobilize and empower blind persons and their parents to become effective advocates,
• Severe shortage of trained human resources in education and rehabilitation,
• Failure to create effective public policy or enforce it where it does exist,
• Weak or non-existent early identification and intervention programs,
• Insufficient empirical data on program models that are effective within the context of a developing country,
• Shortage of affordable teaching aids, low vision devices, textbooks and lack of access to new technologies.

The international non-governmental organizations involved in services for persons with visual impairment have been raising concern about these issues in various global forums for many years. However, until the 1990s there was no concerted coordinated effort to promote the cause of educational equity for these children.

EFA CAMPAIGN — THE TIME LINE
Leading international non-governmental governmental organizations serving persons with visual impairment met in Pontevedra, Spain on 27-29, 2005 to draw up a framework to ensure educational equity to all children with visual impairment, especially in developing countries. The framework builds on the intiatives outlined below:

• During the mid-1990s, International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI) and the World Blind Union (WBU) made the first attempt to arrive at a joint educational policy statement.
• During 2000, the Christoffel Blindenmission / Christian Blind Mission and the Sight Savers International came together to prepare a joint policy on education for serving children with visual impairment.
• The ICEVI and the WBU pledged in 2001 to work together to further the earlier work on developing the joint policy statement.
• ICEVI conducted a strategic planning meeting in February 2002. Facilitating education for all children with visual impairment emerged as the first goal of ICEVI’s strategic plan.
• The strategic goals of ICEVI were shared with the delegates of the world conference of ICEVI held in July 2002 in the Netherlands and the regions of ICEVI were requested to prepare needs assessment of the respective regions to prioritize the key areas to achieve education for all.
• The executive committee of ICEVI which met in Stellenbosch, South Africa in March 2003 decided to prepare a comprehensive paper for discussion at the executive committee meeting in 2004.
• A draft paper on education for all children with visual impairment was prepared and tabled at the meeting of the executive committee of ICEVI held in February 2004 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Members discussed in groups and offered a number of constructive suggestions.
• A Joint Educational Policy Statement (JEPS) of ICEVI and the World Blind Union was released at the Africa Forum held in Midrand, South Africa in May 2004.
• In October 2004, ICEVI analysed existing education policy statements such as the ICEVI-WBU JEPS and the CBM-SSI agreements and incorporated key elements of these papers into the EFA global campaign concept paper. ICEVI also suggested that the model followed in the Vision 2020 campaign be applied in the education sector too wherever possible.
• ICEVI executive committee, which met in Madrid, Spain in March 2005 reviewed the revised EFA concept paper and suggested that leading international non-governmental organizations and inter-governmental organizations such as the UNESCO and UNICEF be involved to develop detailed action plans for actualizing the ideas of the concept paper.
• The concept paper was further revised in June 2005 on the basis of suggestions received from the ICEVI executive committee and representatives of international organisations.
• An Interim Task Force chaired by Larry Campbell, President, ICEVI was formed in November 2005 in Pontevedra, Spain which comprises representatives of Christoffel Blindenmission/Christian Blind Mission (CBM), Hilton-Perkins Programme (HPP), International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI), Norwegian Association for the Blind and Partially Sighted (NABPS), Overbrook International Program (OIP), Sight Savers International (SSI), Spanish National Organisation of the Blind (ONCE), and World Blind Union (WBU). The Interim Task Force reports to the executive committee of ICEVI.

As can be seen, the development of the campaign is part an evolutionary process. The following document has emerged from campaign’s Interim Task Force.

CAMPAIGN PARAMETERS
We realize that the causes of inadequate services will not change overnight but our aim is to promote and support the rights of children with visual impairment to education.

We are determined that more vulnerable groups such as children with visual impairment who are deafblind or multiply disabled should become an integral part of the campaign. Whenever the term “children with visual impairment” is used in the campaign it should be understood to include these groups within the spectrum of blindness and low vision.

We realize that the principles of the campaign need to be incorporated into national goals and plans to provide education for all children with disabilities. Therefore, our approach will be to contribute to the global EFA campaign and concentrate on children with visual impairment.

We recognise the fact that educational services have been rapidly increasing in many parts of the world during the last couple of decade

We place on record the differences that exist between the countries even within the developing nations in terms of education policies, implementation strategies, and curricula, and therefore the attainment of literacy should be looked into in the context of specific countries and the strategies should also be country specific in nature.

What we want to insure is the equity at the entry level to education and access to all types of services. We would like to see that the level of literacy that has been achieved for the sighted children is achieved in the case of children with visual impairment too.

We lay special emphasis on girl children with visual impairment and children from rural areas who need increased attention in the campaign.

We realize that universal primary education in the case of children with visual impairment should be achieved in order to address the Millennium Development Goals.

In accordance with the parameters outlined above, the working title of the campaign will be “Education For All Children with Visual Impairment (EFAVI)” and it’s aim is to achieve educational equity and access for children with visual impairment especially in the developing countries.

WHAT ARE THE GOALS OF THE EFAVI CAMPAIGN?
The EFAVI campaign seeks to achieve the following:

• To ensure the early detection of children with visual impairment and the provision of appropriate early intervention services
• To facilitate the provision of necessary services to all children with visual impairment
• To improve the skills of general and specialized classroom teachers to facilitate access for all children with visual impairment in appropriate programmes.
• To facilitate the adoption of a child-centred curriculum in education to enhance literacy and foster the acquisition of knowledge and life-oriented skills
• To ensure the retention in schools of children with visual impairment who are admitted, thereby reducing the dropout rate
• To increase the achievement level of children with visual impairment in their academic, social and physical development
• To create greater awareness among the community of the capabilities of children with visual impairment and to encourage the acceptance of these blind and low vision children in society.

HOW WILL THE CAMPAIGN BE CARRIED FORWARD?
Drawing on the model of the VISION 2020 campaign coordinated by the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, ICEVI will take lead in this education campaign in partnership with the World Blind Union. The activities of the campaign may be broadly categorised under the following headings:

• Awareness building
• Advocacy
• Programme development and implementation
• Human resource development, and
• Fund raising

The tasks will be divided into those which require immediate attention, those which need to evolve in the first two years of the campaign and the tasks which should be looked into during the first five years of the campaign. Though inevitably some activities will overlap the tasks can be grouped as follows:

Tasks for immediate attention:
The key preparation tasks are scheduled for completion by July 2006 in time for the campaign to be launched at the 12th World Conference of ICEVI to be held from 16 to 21 July 2006 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
• Developing a logo and title for the campaign
• Developing a business plan
• Establishing linkages for the purpose of networking and advocacy with UNESCO, UNICEF and others
• Establishing a formal relation between ICEVI/WBU and UNESCO & UNICEF
• Securing formal WBU commitment and involvement for a partnership role in the campaign and the programme
• Preparing leaflets, brochures and other mass media materials for the campaign
• Forming a global task force for implementation of the business plan
• Developing a specific website

Tasks to be addressed during the first two years of the campaign:
The first two years constitute the formative stage of the campaign and concrete plans will be in place for programme development, monitoring and assessment and for making further refinements. The following tasks are scheduled for completion at this stage.

• Identifying specific target groups and strategies for awareness building
• Developing and implementing an advocacy strategy
• Identifying potential target groups and strategies for fund-raising at the global, regional, and national levels
• Developing guidelines for the development of national plans
• Identifying and developing an operational research to support the campaign
• Developing a process and tools to identify the number of children with visual impairment who are in need of educational services and doing an analysis of existing resources (e.g., WHO protocol for the deaf)
• Preparing a curricula for leadership training programmes
• Capitalizing on appropriate special events to advance the global campaign and programme
• Identifying and involving other INGDOs and other relevant groups related to children, education and disability
• Building monitoring and evaluation mechanisms into all programmes
• Planning strategies for early identification and intervention
• Supporting advocacy programmes at the global, regional and at the national level
• Developing a mechanism for managing funds at the regional and national levels
• Establishing appropriate administrative infrastructure for the EFA campaign
• Identifying priority countries for implementation of EFA during the first phase.
• Developing appropriate curricula for human resource development programmes
• Facilitating provision of specialized educational materials and equipment
• Establishing national forums involving Governments, locally available national NGOs, inter-governmental organisations and other stakeholders
• Preparing national plans
• Mobilizing all appropriate and existing resources in support of the national plan
• Planning strategies for involving general education and families in the national plans
• Making analysis of what is available and what is needed in the region through specialised and general networks.
• Identifying sites for centres of excellence at the regional levels
• Developing a regional mechanism to support the national forums and to support regional human resource development and assistive technology

Tasks to be addressed during the first five years of the campaign:
At the beginning of the third year, the campaign activities will focus on consolidating experience gained during the initial phase of programme development and on strategies for the expansion of the campaign. The following tasks will need attention at this stage:

• Evolving a toolkit for programme implementation
• Creating programmes for partnership between schools in the developed world and programmes for children with visual impairment in the developing world
• Advocating that plans for the education of children with visual impairment be incorporated in the existing national educational plans
• Reviewing and advocating for non-discrimination and equal treatment in national policies and legislation
• Incorporating fast-track strategies in the national plan to address the educational needs of low vision children
• Developing educational service delivery models suitable for the rural areas

The review of the progress at every stage will provide valuable guidance for changing strategies to achieve the desired goal.

GLOBAL CAMPAIGN – A SYMBOL OF SYNERGY
The EFAVI campaign will serve as a catalyst for education of all children with disabilities. The collaboration established in Pontevedra, Spain is significant from the point of view that the three leading umbrella organisations in services for persons with visual impairment namely IAPB, ICEVI, and WBU came together along with the leading funding organisations to address the vital issue of education for all children with visual impairment. The Interim Task Force believes that other organisations working for persons with visual impairment around the world will also join this campaign by endorsing the “Pontevedra Communiqué” and taking active part in the activities of the campaign in the years to come. The experiences gained during the first five years of the campaign will be valuable to refine strategies and scale-up services so that millions of children with visual impairment can access education and begin the process of becoming contributing citizens of the society.

IMPACT OF Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation Grant in Creating Educational Access for Blind Children in the Developing World

The grant of US $ 500,000 received from the Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation (LCF) during the quadrennium helped ICEVI to implement more than 200 projects that have brought concrete benefits to nearly 9000 teachers, parents, and other personnel and more than 150,000 children with visual impairment. The grant has not only helped ICEVI to strengthen programs serving blind children in Africa, Asia and Latin America but it has led to a breakthrough at the international level that may for the first time mean that educational equity for blind children in the developing world will become a reality. ICEVI, acting in partnership with the World Blind Union, will be launching its global campaign to ensure educational equity for children with visual impairment throughout the world. ICEVI has already requested Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation to continue its support in the next quadrennium too to the global campaign to capitalize on the investments of the past four years.

TECH-TALK

Mathematics Braille

M.N.G. Mani, ICEVI and S.N Goswami, Shashanka J.Dutta, Sagarika Datta,
Webel Mediatronics Ltd., P1 Taratala Road Kolkatta – 700 088

(This article has many diagrams and therefore, the html version is incomplete. If you need the pdf version of the article, please contact oficevi@vsnl.net)

Abstract
Editors that can convert English text to Braille and conversely Braille to English text have been around for decades, similarly we have text editors to convert Mathematical symbols like Square Root, Integration, and Statistical symbols. But what we don’t have is an integrated application interface that supports these functions simultaneously, allowing users to compose mathematical? text in a user? friendly format and subsequently convert it into Braille. We propose a system to achieve this. Research on ‘Writing Mathematical symbols alongside? text’ is still ongoing. We plan to develop a system that will enable users to express in braille any mathematical statement linearly. Braille is entered and edited using six keys as it would be on a mechanical braille writer. The editor includes all the common features of a normal editor like copying, pasting, saving files, opening files etc.

1. Introduction
Our objective is to design a system for publishing Mathematics and Science books in Braille. Using this software, teachers and transcribers can produce relatively simply braille documents for Mathematics and science subjects.


2. Braille Code & Nemeth Braille Code
Braille is a code, which enables blind persons to read and write. It was invented by a blind Frenchman, Louis Braille, in 1829. Braille is embossed by hand (or with a machine) onto thick paper, and read with the fingers moving across on top of the dots. Braille’s basic building block is a rectangular 3x2 six-dot cell, which provides 63 possible combinations representing print letters and symbols. Braille characters take up three times as much space as print. The basic Braille symbol (or cell) is composed of six dots arranged in two vertical columns, each column being three dots high. These dots are numbered as follows:

1 o o 4
2 o o 5
3 o o 6

Because this pattern produces only 63 one-cell symbols (plus the blank cell, which is used as a space), some symbols have multiple meanings, and many symbols which take only one character in print require more than one cell in Braille.

The Nemeth Braille Code for Mathematics and Science Notation is used (obviously) for mathematics and science material, which contains symbols not available in Literary Braille.

The Nemeth Code is not simply an expanded version of the Literary Braille Code; there are many significant differences. For example numerals and some symbols (such as the dollar sign) are written differently and some Literary Code contractions cannot be used under certain circumstances. The codebook, The Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, lists 40 pages of symbols, each page containing between 12 and 21 symbols.


Fig: Nemeth Numerals


3. Text To Braille
Text to Braille conversion is most commonly through the use of ASCII characters using a one–to-one correspondence. Since our system needs to include English characters, Braille and Mathematical symbols simultaneously we need a wide range of characters and therefore our chosen format is the16-bit Unicode format rather than the simpler 8-bit ASCII format.

Fig: Braille ASCII Chart

4. Linear representation of Mathematical Statements
The problem of encoding mathematics for computer processing or electronic communication is longstanding. For many years ASCII was the standard method of formatting mathematical and scientific text but it was difficult to represent complex statements in ASCII, and in 1986 TeX was adopted as a mark-up method for mathematics.

Writing Mathematical symbols with keyboard and getting the saved version of the content is not complicated presently. Because so many work have been developed till now. As for example we can say about Microsoft Word’s Equation Editor. And the software is pretty good. It can insert an equation as an object and edit using the many buttons provided. It is now relatively easy to produce complex mathematical formulae in print using programmes such as Microsoft Word’s Equation Editor but these do not readily convert into braille. When we prepare a file containing English text and Mathematical symbols in print? , in most cases the mathematical statements are inserted as a part of a picture which software designers refer to as an “object”. The following figure depicts an “object” representing a Pythagorean Theorem. It is virtually impossible to convert it electronically into braille.

Fig: equation inserted using MS’s Equation editor.

Another common approach to producing mathematic and scientific text in print is to use? the computer language MathML. MathML is an XML application for describing mathematical notation and capturing both its structure and content. The goal of MathML is to enable mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for text. MathML can be used to encode both mathematical notation and mathematical content. A small example is given here to show tehe use of MathML. We have to write the following MathML code to express (a + b)2 . One form of presentation markup for this example is:
<msup>
<mfenced>
<mrow>
<mi>a</mi>
<mo>+</mo>
<mi>b</mi>
</mrow>
</mfenced>
<mn>2</mn>
</msup>

The content markup for the same example is:
<apply>
<power/>
<apply>
<plus/>
<ci>a</ci>
<ci>b</ci>
</apply>
<cn>2</cn>
</apply>

In its current form it does not convert to Braille since Braille conversion requires mathematical text to be presented in a linear form. For example a linear representation of the statement (a+b)2 might take the form (a+b)<super>2, similarly Log­­ex could be represented as Log<sub>e<val>x.

The codes inside the <> signs are the tags that represent a statement. The principle of the system we are proposing for representing mathematical and scientific formulae is to begin from the Braille and to use Rich Text Format (RTF) – an editing format that automatically saves data in a linear form.

The codes inside <> sign are the tags to represent a statement. We do not use any conventional way for linear representation rather we find what the Braille representation of it, and go forward accordingly. So we do not face problems in representing simple fraction, complex fraction, mixed fraction and so on. Rich Text Format (RTF) is a format that saves data in a linear form. So we choose RTF as our editor format.


5. Rich Text Format
The Rich Text Format (RTF) Specification provides a format for text and graphics interchange that can be used with different output devices, operating environments, and operating systems. RTF uses the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), PC-8, Macintosh, or IBM PC character set to control the representation and formatting of a document, both on the screen and in print. With the RTF Specification, documents created under different operating systems and with different software applications can be transferred between those operating systems and applications. There is a header part and a data part. Data part it stores is nothing but the linear representation of what is written. As for example if you write the expression (a+b)2=a2+b2+2ab, as a header?, RTF will hold the following information for it.

(a+b)\super 2\nosupersub =a\super 2\nosupersub +b\super 2\nosupersub +2ab

So it is really helpful for us to use Rich Text Format.

Braille conversion:
We already said that we are using point-to-point mechanism for Braille conversion. Here is an example of the above statement to show the conversion procedure.

Displayed code: (a+b)2=a2+b2+2ab

Linear code: (a+b)\super 2\nosupersub =a\super 2\nosupersub +b\super 2\nosupersub +2ab

Braille code:

6. Fractions
Fractions in Braille can be represented both spatially and linearly. It is usually easier for a visually impaired person to read them linearly although it becomes difficult to understand spatial representations of large expressions like complex and hyper complex fractions through this method. Expressions like integrals and summations are also usually represented in linear form. For our purposes we have adopted a linear presentation approach for fractions e.g. (1/2+3/4)/(1/3+2/3).

7. Editing in Braille
If required we can edit the converted code using six keys on the keyboard S, D, F, J, K and L each representing a dot in the basic braille cell. Using these six keys we can get all the combinations for single cell Braille signs.

S - dot 3
D - dot 2
F - dot 1
J - dot 4
K - dot 5
L - dot 6

We can define two states for each key ‘0’ and ‘1’. A pressed, key represents “1” but unpressed it represents 0. This is the format of the binary string that will be formed after each stroke.


E.g. if only F key is pressed and rest are left then the corresponding string will be 00000001. We define a hash-table to get all combinations of the Braille codes. Here is a small part of the hash-table.

8. Mathematics Braille Editor Interface and Language Selection

Fig: Math Editor Interface

To select the language of your choice, click on the Language select pop up on the Status Bar. Default Language is English. Clicking left mouse button when English language is selected will change it to Six Keys mode. Click again to come back to English.

9. Results and Discussion
Here is an example file that is composed in our system along with the converted Braille file, is given.

Discussions:
This is the one and only one editor that supports simultaneous occurrence of writing and converting exists. Converted Braille file is editable using six keys in Braille. Mathematics Toolbar is available for inserting symbols. Conversion to Braille is done as per Nemeth Braille standard. It provides the facility to take normal print and also Braille print. Embossing through Index Interpoint Braillers is possible from here. The system has some errors in Braille conversion. As there is a number of rules for Braille conversion, the process of incorporating new rules are also going on.


Fig: Mathematics Toolbar


References
1. Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science, 1972, American Association of the Workers for the blind, Association for education of the visually impaired and National Braille Association
2. www.w3.org/TR/MathML2.htm for MathML specification

News from the Regions

The ICEVI regions have been as busy as ever. A major task for regional chairs has been to help the Program Committee of the 12th World conference select abstracts for presentation. Every abstract has been reviewed at a regional level before being recommended to the Program Committee for consideration. All of this is on top of a hectic regional schedule!

The Africa region is making arrangements for two regional workshops – one on teacher preparation and the other on teaching mathematics to visually impaired children — with a view to prepare master trainers who in turn will conduct sub-regional activities. The Regional Committee will meet in Kenya in February 2006 to review the progress of the Africa region in the current quadrennium and plan further activities.

The East Asia region held its regional committee meeting in October 2005 and resolved to bring more participants from the ASEAN counties to the world conference in order to develop networking between the countries within the region. The committee also developed guidelines for sponsorship of candidates for the world conference. Mavis Campos, Regional Chairperson and other ICEVI officers took part in the international symposium on inclusive education conducted in Bukkittingi, Indonesia in September 2005.

In November 2005 the first meeting of the European Committee in the new composition took place. The European region is proposing to distribute the European Newsletter digitally from 2006, hoping that it can play an important role for communication within the region. The region is proposing to organise a teacher training workshop, a European meeting of psychologists and an expert meeting to establish a new framework for professional work. In the coming months attention will also be focused on the development of the European programme for the quadrennium and preparations for the next European Conference 2008/2009.

The Latin America region organised a sub-regional conference on inclusion in Chile in October 2005, which was attended by over 100 teachers and professionals from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay and the host country. Online courses in early intervention, visual rehabilitation and visual stimulation were also launched in Paraguay, Venezuela, Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia. Eight courses on Low Vision, Multiple Disability, Deafblindness, and Activities of Daily Living were conducted in Brazil with the support from CBM International. The regional chairperson, Lucia Piccione, visited various regions in Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina, to assess the impact of services on the needs of people with visual impairment and to meet with officials of Ministry of Education and representatives from local institutions.

Following the meeting of Dr. Susan Spungin, Chairperson of the North America and Caribbean region and Ms. June Waugh, Chair of the Children Education Committee of the World Blind Union with Ms. Ann Veneman, Chief of UNICEF on May 6, 2005, the region is continuing its networking with organisations throughout the region to improve the quality of services to children with visual impairment.

The Pacific region participated in the UNESCO sponsored regional workshop on inclusive Education in Apia, Samoa and voiced the need for promoting inclusive education in the unreached areas of Pacific region. Sandic Mackevicius represented ICEVI at this workshop.

The West Asia region, in collaboration with Lions International, delivered a number of capacity building programmes in the State of Gujarat, India. It also worked with the Indian Satellite Research Organisation (ISRO) to launch the first radio station for blind persons in Ahmedabad. The region had planned to conduct a seminar on inclusive education in Pakistan in October 2005 but it had to be postponed due to the devastating earthquake in the region.

As can be seen, the ICEVI regions are already striving hard to promote the mission and vision of ICEVI, and the launch of the EFAVI global campaign (education for all children with visual impairment) will demand even more of the regions during the ensuing quadrennium.

Publications of ICEVI

Mathematics Made Easy for Children with Visual Impairment:
Recognizing the need to promote good mathematics education among children with visual impairment, the Overbrook-Nippon Network for Educational Technology (ON-NET) and the International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI) has published a book that every teacher of children with visual impairment will want as a resource in teaching mathematics. The material presented in this publication is divided into five modules. Module 1 deals with the commonly used methods of teaching mathematics to visually impaired children. This section also includes valuable information on preparing mathematics text material, the learning characteristics of visually impaired children, and evaluation procedures in mathematics. Module 2 provides the teacher with detailed self-instructional procedures to learn and teach the effective use of the abacus. The exercises included in this module include addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fraction, decimals, square roots, and percentages. Module 3 provides instruction in the use of the Nemeth Braille code for all secondary level mathematical notations. Each code is described in detail and accompanied by illustrations. Module 4 provides instructions on how to adapt procedures for teaching nearly 500 secondary level mathematical concepts. During field testing this module was found to be particularly helpful to non-mathematics teachers in both understanding and teaching concepts to the visually impaired learner. Module 5 deals with a range of creative math activities including paper folding and use of the natural environment in teaching and understanding basic and secondary mathematical concepts.

This publication is a result of three years of research and development by a project development team co-chaired by Dr. M.N.G. Mani and Ms. Aree Plernchaivanich with contributions from teachers throughout Asia. This publication can be ordered for US$35.00 plus shipping and handling from ICEVI Secretariat (sgicevi@vsnl.net) or Overbrook School for the Blind (dennis@obs.org)

WIMATS – Mathematics Transcription Software brought out:
ICEVI and M/s. Webel Mediatronics, Kolkata, India have also brought out WIMATS (Webel-ICEVI Mathematics Transcription Software) to facilitate easy transcription of mathematics books into Braille format. This software enables reproduction of visual format of the mathematical text on the screen. The codes used at the secondary level mathematics are grouped under different categories such as functions dealing with fractions, shapes, algebraic operations, inequalities, etc., so that the transcriber knows where to locate the inserted figure, shape, symbol, etc. The software is Windows based and is compatible to work with all types of Braille embossers. Those wishing further information and updates on this WIMATS Software (Webel-ICEVI Mathematics Transcription Software) should direct inquires to the ICEVI Secretariat sgicevi@vsnl.net

Uganda Research Report published:
In 2003 ICEVI initiated a research study in Uganda to identify the factors that should be in place to make education of children with visual impairment successful in local primary schools. Uganda was selected for this research because the country has a policy to promote for inclusion. The research has now been completed and the preliminary results of the study were presented at the International Symposium on Inclusive Education in Bukkitinggi, Indonesia on 26-30 September 2005. Mr. Martin Omagar, Commissioner of Disabilities, Government of Uganda who also attended the symposium confirmed to participants that the research findings provide an accurate portrait of the current situation of children with visual impairment in Uganda and stated that he hoped the research could be replicated in other parts of Africa. He also expressed desire to work closely with ICEVI to plan further strategies in implementing the salient recommendations of the study. ICEVI is happy that the results of this research are valued by the Government of Uganda and by the international organizations working for persons with visual impairment in Uganda. ICEVI records its gratitude to the Sight Savers International for the support extended through its field office in Kampala and to Dr. Steve McCall and his research team for completing the study. Ie Local data collectors trained by the research team collected information on the education of over 100 children with visual impairment in mainstream schools regions throughout Uganda. Input from children and parents, class teachers and specialist teachers provide insights into the processes impacting on the identification, participation and progress of children with visual impairment in both the school and the community. The report explores the situation of a wide range children with blindness, low vision including children with complex additional needs and identifies key barriers to their inclusion in education. It illustrates the particular vulnerability of children who use braille and children who have additional disabilities, and considers issues that cause children to drop out of school or miss out on education altogether. The report concludes with recommendations on the critical issues that need to be considered in planning provision for children with visual impairment in developing countries. It is planned to build on the research in a major collaboration between ICEVI, Sight Savers International and The University of Birmingham UK that begins this year.

The report is available on the website of ICEVI. Hard copies of the research report are also available from the ICEVI Secretariat (sgicevi@vsnl.net) for US $10.00. ICEVI hopes to conduct replication studies in other countries in the coming quadrennium.

New China Journal on Education of Children with Visual Impairment

ICEVI extends congratulations and best wishes to Ms. Li Pingyi, Principal of the Beijing School for the Blind for the leadership role she and her colleagues are taking in developing a new China journal on education of children with visual impairment. The first issue of this new professional journal is expected to be published this Spring. We are certain this will be an outstanding contribution to furthering education of blind and low vision children in China. Persons wishing further information on this new publications should contact: Ms. Li Pingyi, Beijing School for the Blind, No. 11 Wuluju Haidian District, Beijing 100089 PRC. e-mail : beijingmangxiao@vip.sina.com